LCA

    Launch of Uganda LCA Network

    The Life Cycle Initiative has been providing support and advice in various countries to set up LCA networks for further strengthening of LCA activities in different regions. During February-March 2016, meetings were co-organized with support of local Bureau of Standards and local LCA practitioners in three East African countries: Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda. Since then local practitioners in these countries have been working towards formally setting up their own networks.

    Call for Paper Submissions for “The Future of Ecolabels”

    The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment is preparing a special issue on ecolabels: “The Future of Ecolabels“. Paper submissions are encouraged about the theoretical background, practical implementation and lessons learned about Ecolabels applied in both policies and corporate strategies. Deadline is 30th of September!

    Call for Article Submissions for The Journal of Industrial Ecology

    The Journal of Industrial Ecology invites you to submit articles for a special issue on the Life Cycle Assessment of Emerging Technologies. Deadline is 1 September,2018.

    Open Consultation: ISO 21930 Guidance

    The PCR Committee of the American Center of Life Cycle Assessment (ACLCA) is posting the draft ISO 21930 Guidance for open consultation. They expect to receive comments on ACLCA’s DRAFT 21930 Guidance(PDF) by filling out the Consultation Comment Form

    Deadline for the comments is August 19, 2018 

    Could Life Cycle Models Impact Big Change in the Solid Waste Management Industry?

    A lifecycle model, adapted from a model that primarily researchers use to evaluate solid waste practices, is rolling out to the public. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is releasing a user-friendly version that’s free to local and state governments and others—even though lifecycle thinking challenges how the agency has encouraged them to manage their trash.

    Journal Paper: From Water-Use to Water-Scarcity Footprinting in Environmentally Extended Input–Output Analysis

    Environmentally extended input–output analysis (EEIOA) supports environmental policy by quantifying how demand for goods and services leads to resource use and emissions across the economy. However, some types of resource use and emissions require spatially explicit impact assessment for meaningful interpretation, which is not possible in conventional EEIOA. For example, water use in locations of scarcity and of abundance are not environmentally equivalent.

    ISO TC207 explores role in circular economy

    ISO TC207 (Environmental Management) is the parent Technical Committee that oversees standardisation in life cycle assessment (TC207/SC5), along with environmental labelling (TC207/SC3), greenhouse gas management (TC207/SC7), environmental management systems (TC207/SC1) and other related activities.

    Key Role for EPDs in reshaped Australian Green Star System

    Planning for the next version of the Australian Green Star building environmental rating system has commenced. Due for release from 2020, it is proposed to include an increased focus on the environmental and social impacts of products and materials.

    ALCAS webinar volunteers wanted

    ALCAS is looking for interested parties to organize joint webinars. The ALCAS webinar series consists of about 6 webinars per year, covering general LCA-related topics of interest to wider audiences as well as some more specialized topics for LCA specialists. By joining forces with other organizations, ALCAS aims to increase reach and inform more people of recent developments.

    If you are interested, please send an email to Maartje Sevenster at info@alcas.asn.au

    Evaluating the environmental impact of debit card payments

    Consumers in the Netherlands made more than 3.2 billion debit card transactions at points-of-sale in 2015, corresponding to over half of all point-of-sale payments in that year. This study provides insights into the environmental impact of debit card transactions based on a life cycle assessment (LCA). In addition, it identifies several areas within the debit card payment chain where the environmental impact can be reduced. 

    Read more at: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11367-017-1408-6 

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